Read my book ‘Hip Hop Authenticity and the London Scene’ for free for the next 30 days

hip-hop-authenticity_speersMy publisher Routledge are running a promotional offer where you can access and read my entire book Hip Hop Authenticity and the London Scene for free (RRP £110) for an entire month.

This link will take you to the whole book (enhanced pdf format and mobile friendly): http://rdcu.be/tPj4

I hope this initiative attracts readers and students who can’t afford the book and they enjoy reading it.

Feel free to share the link more widely while it is live.

Advertisements

Book manuscript submitted!

 

I’m very pleased to announce that this week I submitted my book manuscript entitled Hip-Hop Authenticity and the London Scene. The book is based on my PhD research which looked at the struggles artists in the London hip-hop scene negotiate in order to ‘keep it real’.

The book is published with Routledge and if all goes smoothly will be out at the end of the year (2016). You can pre-order it on Amazon here.

This blurb tells you a bit more about the book:

This book explores the highly-valued, and often highly-charged, ideal of authenticity in hip-hop — what it is, why it is important, and how it affects the day-to-day life of rap artists. By analyzing the practices, identities, and struggles that shape the lives of rappers in the London scene, the study exposes the strategies and tactics that hip-hop practitioners engage in to negotiate authenticity on an everyday basis. In-depth interviews and fieldwork provide insight into the nature of authenticity in global hip-hop, and the dynamics of cultural appropriation, globalization, marketization, and digitization through a combined set of ethnographic, theoretical, and cultural analysis.

The volume provides a much-needed intervention in popular music debates where authenticity is predominantly theorized as either essentialist or socially constructivist in nature. Based on an empirically-driven analysis, Speers redefines authenticity as an emergent human capacity, produced through situated practices, in a changing world. This advances the discussion in the field beyond static, discursive, or imagined notions of authenticity, which has considerable implications beyond the case study of London. Despite growing attention to authenticity in popular music, this book is the first to offer a comprehensive theoretical model explaining the reflexive approaches hip-hop artists adopt to ‘live out’ authenticity in everyday life.